Address

US Steel Tower, 48th Floor
600 Grant St, Suite 4875
Pittsburgh, PA 15219

1628 JFK Blvd, Suite 1650

Philadelphia, PA 19103

Contact

412-626-5626

©2020 by RUPPERT MANES NARAHARI LLC 
We work hard to make sure that all our information is correct. However, you should never rely on legal information you read on this or any other website without consulting with a licensed attorney. Nothing on this website shall be interpreted as legal advice or as creating an attorney-client relationship. RMN specifically disclaims all representations and warranties and urges you to call an attorney if you have any legal questions.

Search
  • ce0869

Can You Get Unemployment if You Quit Your Job?

A commonly asked question among employees in Pennsylvania regarding unemployment benefits is whether one can still receive them if he or she voluntarily quit at his or her place of employment – rather than being terminated.


The answer is not as cut-and-dry as one may think. When an employee voluntarily quits his or her position at their place of employment, they may be entitled to unemployment benefits if there was a good cause for quitting. Now, one may ask what exactly constitutes a “good” reason, and the answer to that is also not concrete. In general, the reason must be necessitous and compelling in order to satisfy the requirement – e.g. you had no choice but to quit your job, and you made every effort you could in order to keep it.


Many times, scenarios arise where employees feel they are being forced out of their positions, and this can be for a number of reasons. Often, employers will create hostile work environments or simply make your job unfathomable to the average person. In these cases, one cannot be blamed for feeling that they must quit; your personal wellbeing should never be compromised due to your work environment.


Now, you’ve quit your job and fear that you are no longer eligible for unemployment benefits. Luckily, the attorneys at RUPPERT MANES NARAHARI have dealt with countless cases, which involve individuals who may have voluntarily quit their positions, but should still receive unemployment benefits.


If you’ve found yourself in a position like the one above and believe that you had both a compelling and necessitous reason for quitting, and you did all that you could to maintain the employee/employer relationship prior to quitting, then you should fight for your right to unemployment benefits. The attorneys at RMN are here to help you in this fight.


Please call us for a free consultation.

14 views